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Research

Dr. Kishore presented a research poster at the annual meeting of Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in Seattle in May, 2013 on the differentiation of culture positive endophthalmitis from non-infectious endophthalmitis following intravitreal anti-VEGF injections. The results showed that retinal hemorrhages and hypopyon were specific for culture positive eyes and conjunctival congestion was more severe. Culture negative inflammation after the injections may be caused by immune mechanisms in some eyes. Because culture positive endophthalmitis represents a true ophthalmic emergency requiring emergent treatment with either intravitreal antibiotics or vitrectomy to save the eye, differentiation between culture positive and sterile inflammation has the potential to prevent unnecessary surgical prcedures in these eyes. Click here to view the poster.

Dr. Kishore presented a research poster at the 30th annual meeting of American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) in Las Vegas in August, 2012. The poster showed that patients with diabetic macular edema who had prior vitrectomy surgery do not respond well to anti-VGEF injections but show a good response to intravitreol steriods. Click here to view the poster.

Dr. Kishore presented a research poster at the annual meeting of Association for Resarch in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in May 2012 in Florida. The poster showed that resolution of a submacular hemorrhage due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration from anti-VEGF injections is accompanied by marked reduction in soft drusen. The mechanism is unknown at this time, but most likely involves activation of macrophages that phagocytose drusen material. Since spontaneous evolution of large soft drusen commonly results in geographic atrophy and loss of central vision, there is an unmet need to make drusen go away. Click here to view the poster.

Dr. Kishore presented a research poster at the 29th annual meeting of the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) August 2011 in Boston. The poster described management of age-related macular degeneration in patients who previously underwent a vitrectomy procedure. Dr. Kishore’s team found that most such eyes can be managed with periodic injections of avastin or lucentis. Click here to view the poster.

Dr. Kishore presented two research posters at the 28th annual meeting of the American society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) in August 2010. The first research project was regarding treatment of patients with wet macular degeneration who present with bleeding under the macula. Dr. Kishore and his team noted that most of these patients can be treated with monthly injections of avastin in the vitreous cavity, and if diagnosed and treated within one week from the onset of bleeding, a good outcome can be expected in most patients. Click here to view the poster.

The second research project was regarding a new treatment for a rare but serious viral infection of the retina, called acute retinal necrosis. It is caused by one of the Herpes viruses and carries a poor prognosis despite treatment. Dr. Kishore has proposed a treatment that might improve outcome in such eyes. Click here to view the poster.

Educational Articles